Technologizer

Google Graveyard, Meet Microsoft’s Morgue

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“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Then quit. No use being a damn fool about it.”

–W.C. Fields

Google used its official blog today to announce that it’s discontinuing a bunch of products. They range from the rather well-known iGoogle personalized home page to curios I’d never heard about until now, such as a search app for Symbian.

The move is just the most recent of several mass executions which Google has performed since Larry Page returned to the position of CEO last year and declared that the company would henceforth be putting more wood behind fewer arrows. (Its biggest arrow right now? Google+, hands down.)

Depending on your perspective, the company’s ongoing elimination of underperformers (and products which no longer fit its strategic aims) is embarrassing, inevitable, unfortunate or admirable. Maybe a bit of all of the above. It’s certainly preferable to letting them fester, which is what was happening to a goodly percentage of the items in question before they officially became goners.

Google’s bad news inspired Frank Shaw, Microsoft’s head PR honcho, to engage in some creative schadenfreude: He compiled a Pinterest board called Google Graveyard and filled it with images of departed Google products and services. Just to make sure I saw the board, a representative from Microsoft’s PR agency dropped me an e-mail with a link to it, noting that Google disclosed the discontinuations right before a national holiday, as if it were trying to–gasp!–minimize the attention paid to them.

On first blush, I found Microsoft’s move odd. Publicly reveling in your competitors’ foul-ups seems undignified. It also feels inconsistent with a laser focus on making your own products as cool and successful as they can possibly be.

But you know what? Maybe I’m just jealous that I didn’t think of the idea first: It’s pretty darn clever. And Shaw’s Google Graveyard isn’t necessarily a devastating commentary on Google mishaps.

Scanning through its contents, you might also come away with a favorable impression of Google as a company that’s willing to try a lot of things and realistic enough to know when they aren’t working. A company which, in fact, has a lot in common with Microsoft.

Microsoft Morgue

Pinterest

Over its 37-year history, Shaw’s employer has jumped into at an array of categories with at least as much gusto as Google. It’s often jumped out of them, either lickety-split (Windows Smart Displays) or after years of effort (Microsoft Money). And like Google, it’s lately been more self-restrained and seems to be trying to do fewer things, only better.

So in shameless imitation of the Google Graveyard, I’ve created a Microsoft Morgue over at Pinterest. It contains some–though hardly all–of the company’s offerings which have gone to the Big Microsoft Store in the Sky in recent years. Every one of them helped make Microsoft…well, Microsoft. Just as Google’s failures have helped strengthen its character.

32 comments
IrishWonder
IrishWonder

Google Graveyard is not a new idea - the first one I know of has been compiled almost 2 years ago here http://www.wordstream.com/arti... (discussion on Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/google... as proof of date since the Wordstream site has no date for that post). Microsoft Morgue, on the other hand, seems to be a fresh idea and I'm honestly surprised nobody did it before, considering how they retire products (renaming their search engine alone is worth a separate infographic/timeline)

John
John

Given that there's two Zune related entries, one of them is actually incorrect. Everyone knows the devices have been retired, but the Zune music service still very much exists. And is going to continue to exist, albeit with a different name.

Firozali A.Mulla
Firozali A.Mulla

 

Before

we embark to change any we have to change our thinking The Bank of England

Governor says that the culture in the UK banking industry "must

change". Speaking at a press conference, the Bank's Governor Sir Mervyn

King said that the UK is a victim of a "vicious circle" of reduced

bank lending, and that the culture in banks must change. He said that

implementing Vickers reforms is the most important change needed to improve the

UK banking industry, but insisted that banks do not need a "Leveson

style" inquiry. When asked about the recent controversy over the Libor

inter bank-lending rate, which has seen Barclays receive a ?290m fine for

rigging the rate, Sir Mervyn King said that manipulating Libor was

"deceitful" and that it needed reform. But he added that financial

regulation cannot stop bad behaviour in the City. The Bank of England also said

that the UK's financial outlook has worsened due to the Eurozone crisis, as the

economic problems in the EU are "deep-seated". Sir David Walker is

one of the city grandees who has been approached to look into what went wrong

at Barclays. He also revealed that former government minister and Standard

Chartered boss Lord Davies has been touted to be part of the bank inquiry.

Barclays has not yet consented to such an inquiry. Furthermore, the boss of

Barclays has said that he won't resign despite the rate rigging scandal. Royal

Bank of Scotland could face a hefty fine from the same interest rate rigging

scandal that has hammered Barclays this week and left its boss Bob Diamond

fighting for his job. Taxpayer-backed RBS is set to be fined about 150 million

pounds ($233 million) for participating in market manipulation offences similar

to those engaged in by Barclays, the Times newspaper said. RBS said it, like

many others, is continuing to co-operate with regulators on the on-going

investigation. Any resolution of its case is months away, a person familiar

with the matter said. Britain's banking woes deepened on Friday as the

Financial said it had settled with four banks - Barclays, RBS, HSBC and Lloyds

- after finding evidence they mis-sold products to protect small businesses

against a rise in interest rates. Compensation could run into the hundreds of

millions of pounds, lawyers have said, although Lloyds said the cost for it

would not be material. The FSA said from 2001 to date, banks sold around 28,000

interest rate protection products to customers, although it did not say how

much it would cost the banks The words a father speaks to his children in the

privacy of the home are not overheard at the time, but, as in whispering

galleries, they will be clearly heard at the end and by posterity. -Jean Paul

Richter, writer (1763-1825) The Bank of England began a two-day monetary

policy meeting on Wednesday that was widely expected to result in more stimuli

to boost Britain's recession-hit economy. Britain's BoE is set to keep its key

interest rate at a record-low 0.50 percent -- where it has stood for more than

three years -- and agree to pump out another £50 billion ($78 billion, 62

billion euros) in fresh cash, analysts said. The central bank's Monetary Policy

Committee has so far pumped the economy with £325 billion under its

Quantitative Easing (QE) stimulus policy since March 2009, when it also slashed

its key rate to its all-time low level. "The odds strongly favour the Bank

of England returning to Quantitative Easing at the conclusion of the Monetary

Policy Committee's July meeting on Thursday after halting the programme in May

and June," said Howard Archer, chief UK economist at the IHS Global Insight

consultancy. "Latest economic data and survey evidence have been weaker

and disappointing overall, increasing the risk that the economy suffered

further contraction in the second quarter." I always say who is

listening when there is s down hill task and no brakes. Britain's

financial regulator warned Barclays four months before it was hit by a record

fine for rigging interest rates that the bank's culture was too aggressive and

must change, a person familiar with the matter said.

The disclosure that the regulator believed Barclays had "pushed the

boundaries" in some areas came two days after its U.S. chief executive,

Bob Diamond, was forced to resign because the bank was found to have

manipulated the interest rate that underpins global transactions worth

trillions of dollars. A contrite Diamond, 60, appeared on Tuesday before a

committee of British lawmakers who raised concerns about the relationship

between Barclays, the country's third-biggest bank with a reputation for

aggressive business dealings, and the country's financial regulatory

authorities. Barclays under Diamond had become known as a hard-charging bank

that paid big salaries and bonuses, something that has attracted growing

political, public and press criticism in Britain as the country bumps along in

a double-dip recession that has seen the ranks of the unemployed swelling.

Boastful emails promising gifts of champagne between Barclays traders involved

in the rate rigging scandal prompted calls for big banks to be broken up, with

their retail units split from the riskier investment banking arms, whose

activities the media has said amount to no more than "casino

banking". Andrew Bailey, head of banking supervision at Britain's

Financial Services Authority (FSA), attended a meeting of the entire Barclays

board in February and told the bank to change its ways, the source told Reuters

on Thursday. I think it is particularly salient

when we consider the northern/central European economies (including the

largest, Germany). In northern/central Europe, trade unions are extremely

influential in the labour markets, in terms of setting both wages and working

hours. Apart from trade union members, trade union agreements often determine

wages and working hours for non-union workers as well. The trade unions have

been the most effective in the world in reducing working hours. In so doing,

they help to overcome a market failure in which workers work longer than they

wish to do, because they fear that working less will leave them more vulnerable

than colleagues to job cuts. Despite the steady declines in working hours and

in employment in manufacturing, northern/central Europe produces far more than

it did 40 years ago, and rather more than is needed to meet domestic demand (in

contrast to the Anglo-Saxon economies, which do the opposite). The result is

the large and destabilising current account surpluses we see within the EU

today. Here, however, there is an inter-temporal problem. The point of high

output is to save, to pay for consumption in retirement. However, tomorrow’s

potential consumption will depend on tomorrow’s output. Unless what is saved

today is productively invested in capital that will increase tomorrow’s output,

it is essentially lost. In developing economies, it is relatively easy to find

private investment that will increase future output. The more advanced an

economy becomes; however, the more difficult it is to find investment that will

increase future output. This is especially true in services, where productivity

gains of the sort seen in manufacturing are often simply impossible. Public

investment can help make up the shortfall, but it too has limits. At some

point, the gains from, say, upgrading transport infrastructure, will be smaller

than the costs. Northern/central Europe is far ahead of the Anglo-Saxon

economies in this respect, because infrastructure and public services tend to

be much more developed. The more I read and read about Keynes, the more I agree

with him. However, it is clear from many of the comments on this article that

faith-based neoliberal economics is alive and well. I started off as an

economic liberal myself, convinced that unfettered free markets were, at least

on average, the best way to organise economic activity. I began to have doubts

when, as a student, I realised that I could earn more through part-time,

socially useless speculation in financial markets than people working full-time

to provide essential social services. (Speculation does of course help to make

markets liquid, and to manage risk, but it is simply implausible to claim that

the rewards of speculation are at all commensurate with social worth.) That

realisation shattered my faith in the infallibility of markets, and led me to

appreciate the role of policy makers in designing institutions that align market

outcomes with social objectives. Economies and markets should always be a means

to societal ends, and never ends in themselves. What we have today is huge

population and small bread getting smaller as the real value of the cash is

eroding. What we bought in 90 is not there and you cannot step in the same

running water twice. The water has gone. We have leader who cannot write their

own speeches and depend on other there by goofing the economy, immigration,

manpower, economy and employment. The first course these men ought to take is

to see what is on and state rightly not legally but emotionally. Then they will

win. We are men living our heart throbbing for pat on the back .The Bank of

England began a two-day monetary policy meeting on Wednesday that was widely

expected to result in more stimuli to boost Britain's recession-hit economy.

Britain's BoE is set to keep its key interest rate at a record-low 0.50 percent

-- where it has stood for more than three years -- and agree to pump out

another £50 billion ($78 billion, 62 billion euros) in fresh cash, analysts

said. The central bank's Monetary Policy Committee has so far pumped the

economy with £325 billion under its Quantitative Easing (QE) stimulus policy

since March 2009, when it also slashed its key rate to its all-time low level.

"The odds strongly favour the Bank of England returning to Quantitative

Easing at the conclusion of the Monetary Policy Committee's July meeting on

Thursday after halting the programme in May and June," said Howard Archer,

chief UK economist at the IHS Global Insight consultancy. "Latest economic

data and survey evidence have been weaker and disappointing overall, increasing

the risk that the economy suffered further contraction in the second

quarter." I always say who is listening when there is s down hill task and

no brakes. Britain's financial regulator warned Barclays four months before it

was hit by a record fine for rigging interest rates that the bank's culture was

too aggressive and must change, a person familiar with the matter said. The

disclosure that the regulator believed Barclays had "pushed the

boundaries" in some areas came two days after its U.S. chief executive,

Bob Diamond, was forced to resign because the bank was found to have

manipulated the interest rate that underpins global transactions worth

trillions of dollars. A contrite Diamond, 60, appeared on Tuesday before a

committee of British lawmakers who raised concerns about the relationship

between Barclays, the country's third-biggest bank with a reputation for

aggressive business dealings, and the country's financial regulatory

authorities. Barclays under Diamond had become known as a hard-charging bank

that paid big salaries and bonuses, something that has attracted growing

political, public and press criticism in Britain as the country bumps along in

a double-dip recession that has seen the ranks of the unemployed swelling.

Boastful emails promising gifts of champagne between Barclays traders involved

in the rate rigging scandal prompted calls for big banks to be broken up, with

their retail units split from the riskier investment banking arms, whose

activities the media has said amount to no more than "casino

banking". Andrew Bailey, head of banking supervision at Britain's

Financial Services Authority (FSA), attended a meeting of the entire Barclays

board in February and told the bank to change its ways, the source told Reuters

on Thursday. While they resign they must have taken some security for

themselves to leave us looking at one another expecting another Robin Hood. We

are crazy at times. We know the logic is not legal. The man of 75 marrying a

girl of 25 is legal but not logic We’re supposed to be a

nation of cockeyed optimists. But many feel like haunted wanderers in a dark

forest, knowing that the slightest turn of the foot could fell us. Just

ask Alan L, a 32-year-old from Queens, New York. The path ahead should have

been bright for Alan. After several years as a music industry publicist, he

took the ubiquitous advice of the mid-noughts and went to back to school for a

bachelor’s degree. Yearning to do something more meaningful, Alan imagined

teaching or perhaps working for a non-profit, a job that would put his double

major in history and political science to good use. Today he wakes up in the middle

of the night, gripped by fear. He checks his email compulsively, and suffers

from the strange sensation that he is invisible, that his body is floating in

space. Alan has a job. But not in a school or a non-profit. In fact, he can’t

even score work as a publicist, or even a position at a local bookshop or music

store. Since getting his degree in 2011, Alan has bounced from one temporary

assignment to the next, always aware the next quarterly budget could send him

packing. The specter of $40,000 in student debt is his constant companion. When

Alan decided to go the college route, his parents and friends cheered. Little

did they know that a train wreck was coming. During his second week as a

full-time college student, the economy crashed. Still, Alan worked hard. He

made the Dean’s List. He won awards. “I wasn’t some goofball, flaky student,”

he says. Now he has a constant sense of failure. The temporary office jobs he

lands offer no real path to full-time employment. Tied to budget decisions,

they frequently vanish with little or no warning. “You begin to hear rumours

that your job is going to be cut,” Alan says. “People get passive-aggressive.

It’s stressful.” During what would be his lunch break, Alan runs a mini-command

center on his laptop, scanning job sites and sending out hundreds of resumes.

He’ll have three or four browsers open at one time, constantly hitting the

refresh button on jobs listings to see if any new posts come up. Trying to look

for a job while trying to keep a job is a frantic enterprise. Alan has started

to experience the weird uncanniness of the New Insecurity. He feels like

someone on the outside of society, looking in: “I’m not unemployed, so I’m not

part of the TV narrative. I’m off the grid. The advice I hear sounds like it

was meant for someone else. ‘Live cheaply! Go door-to-door to find a job.’ But

I’m already in minimal, survival mode. And as for going door-to-door in

mid-town Manhattan? The security guards won’t even let me in. My parents keep

saying, ‘You shouldn’t be on your laptop all day.’ But job searches are mostly

done online now—that’s the reality.” I thank you Firozali A.Mulla DBA

 

 

Cristoforo Mantegazza
Cristoforo Mantegazza

And Access?  The original MS offering.  Not the database, the communications program.  So deeply buried that one, that it disappeared from institutional memory and the Access name was recycled as a totally unrelated offering.

zaglossus
zaglossus

Please don't take away my Orkut!

Edna_Bucket
Edna_Bucket

Microsoft often does this. They released news of The Surface hoping they could divert attention away from the Titanic losses Bing has made. When that failed they released news that Windows 8 will sell for $40.

This said, Google is just as bad. When Windows 8 goes the way of The Hindenburg you can rest assured that Google's public relations officer shall be sending emails reading: "Oh, the humanity!".

Schneider Sch
Schneider Sch

The end of software, recently Employees got fired , stocks down, going back to 19th century (best year) and some countries to stone age.

The chip fabrication limits have come to an end. If fewer than 100nm process is used , the chip life is reduced and fails commercially. However with 90nm and dual core processors the software and hardware industry has boomed with many new versions of Operating Systems, each OS cleverly designed with certain features on only some CPU's for profit making issues.

False statement are made by professors, research people amp; claim that in coming months more powerful chips will come which matches the brain, but current chips just struggle with an acrobat reader and the chips have reached limits.

eg: Many false research papers were called back.

From windows 98 to win XP to win7 the OS evolved to multicore cpu compatibility, but as cpu hierarchy came to limits, the microsoft like companies have nothing to develop and nearly 70% of the employees have nothing to do and will be fired in few months.

Till now these companies had the strategy of upgrading from one OS to other OS taking feed back from customers (crash report feed back form) and universities and developed win2000 to winxp to win7

People dont need bulky OS which doesnt have additional features when compared with older versions.

The software OS versions size have bloated from few MB to 100's of MB without any additional functionalities, these bloats are due to implementation of security features, there will be further bloat in OS and ram.

Finally these companies will concentrate on business applications similar to office clerical software work rather than software design.

Only search engine companies will succeed with their cloud capabilities.The reason behind microsoft tried to buy yahoo is to step into cloud. It shifted to Midori. The reason behind microsoft tried to buy yahoo is to step into cloud 

New Chip production with new hierarchies will be ended, but Old hierarchy will be maintained like 2009 hierarchy as no necessity is there for new hierarchy. 

As Unnecessary new instructions, round about computation instructions are put in new chips which are not needed, same with data transfers too.

As Chips grow older, new same ones with same design will be manufactured. Hardware support Industry like Main Boards etc will be there forever as hardware goes older replacement is needed. Some like Sun shifted to iphone, ipod, ipad etc as software limits reached.

Intel amp; Microsoft tried to have monopoly by having their secret instruction amp; OS. 

Giving OLPC to child is like giving him a calculator to do maths instead of asking him to by-heart the multiplication tables. This reduces his learning abilities by giving OLPC and increases diseases with nerve disorders.

Bill tried to produce a Microsoft TV, wonder if he integrated pop vending, rubber vending machine into the Gates TV, Pepsi (Best Drink) vending machine into Bill's TV. This would shun SANYO the worlds best giant, which was down after the digital Memory boom. The reason behind Bills TV is that software reached limits and he needs to shift market.

Silicon valley firmware and software companies will be closed as new software's are not needed due to maturity of chip and OS. Gold and other support minerals used in chips and hardware, also Tantalum, copper are now scarce, the cpu and other hardware price will rise, Lithium battery price rises etc etc....

Finally going back to 19th century and maybe some countries to 15th. 

In few years electricity production goes down and transport will be rare due to petroleum unavailability. Most of the countries will be enjoying their 18-19 century world....

Ron Aquino
Ron Aquino

What about Apple stuff? Like the Newton, the G4 Cube, that iPad-looking laptop with a stylus, Ping?

Taxpyer
Taxpyer

 Apparently, it is stylish to bash Google and Microsoft for trying to innovate.  But when everybody's favorite IT company that can do no wrong fails, they just try to forget about it.

Firozali A.Mulla
Firozali A.Mulla

One thing we had left out totally is the

global warming costs. We assumed this like it was Y2K, now we are paying the

heavy price fro this. Extreme Weather Conditions Cost EU’s Transport System at Least €15

Billion Annually A study

carried out by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland indicates that extreme

weather conditions cost EU transport system at least €15 billion a year.

Currently, the greatest costs incurred are from road accidents, with the

associated material damage and psychological suffering. However, costs arising

from accidents are expected to decrease in volume, though time-related costs

attributable to delays are projected to increase. In part, this is due to climate

change, whose impact on extreme weather phenomena was addressed in the study,

and because of consequent costs. In the study conducted by VTT and EWENT

project partners, researchers calculated the costs, caused by extreme weather

phenomena for the transport system, its users and customers of freight carriers

in the 27 EU member states. This marks the first time calculations have been

completed on this scale and scope. The study shows that the mode of traffic

most vulnerable to extreme weather is road traffic. It continues to have a

higher volume than the other modes, with the additional factor of not being

centralised or professionally controlled, in contrast to rail or aviation. In

particular, the consequences of extreme weather are visible in road traffic in

the form of increased road accidents and the cost arising from them. In other

traffic modes, far more likely than accidents will be time-related costs with a

variety of causes, typically delays. Aviation in particular is prone to

time-related costs in extreme weather. The annual net cost in European aviation

is on the order of billions of euros, borne by travellers and airline

operators. Surprisingly, infrastructure related costs did not have a lion's

share of the total costs. In road traffic, heavy time-related costs are

particularly frequent in freight traffic. At EU level, annual losses, measured

to be around 6 € billions annually, are suffered by the customers of freight

carriers as a result of time-related costs, and here is a risk of continued

growth in costs. This is due to the growth in volumes of freight-carrying

traffic, which is forecast at 1-2 per cent a year. Furthermore, improved

efficiency in production chains accentuates the importance of adherence to

timetables, creating further potential for growth in time-related costs.

Passengers in road traffic will incur time-related costs, as extreme weather

conditions slow down traffic, keeping people away from productive work. At the

same time, however, road accidents will be on the decline in the EU. VTT's

researchers estimate that improvements to vehicle safety, along with the

warming caused by climate change, may reduce the cost arising from road

accidents by as much as half by 2040 -2070. However, the impact of climate

change on extreme weather conditions, along with the cost arising from such

conditions, is hard to estimate with any accuracy. In the North, where most

costs incurred by traffic are attributable to snow and ice, heavy snowfalls may

actually become more frequent, despite climatic warming. In Southern Europe,

one cost factor to be reckoned, but which is studied far too little, with in

the future may be heat waves, leading to decreased pedestrian traffic and

cycling, and to increased motorised traffic. Moreover, as droughts grow in

frequency, so will sand storms and dust storms, and as torrential rains follow

heat waves, soil will become less firm, creating potential for landslides. The

traffic mode least affected by extreme weather is sea traffic. However,

transport by sea is no solution to the problem of the time-related costs,

experienced by European transport traffic, because cost-efficiency continues to

be the factor that dictates the choice of transport mode. Bulk freight is

transported by rail or waterways, with lower average speeds but a better

guarantee against the vagaries of weather. High-priced freight, sensitive to

schedule disruptions, is transported by road and air, which are fast transport

modes but susceptible to the whims of extreme weather. “If at first you don’t succeed,

try, try again. Then quit. No use being a damn fool about it.” –W.C. Fields I thank you Firozali

A.Mulla DBA

Firozali A.Mulla
Firozali A.Mulla

One thing we had left out totally is the

global warming costs. We assumed this like it was Y2K, now we are paying the heavy

price fro this. Extreme Weather Conditions Cost EU’s Transport System at Least €15

Billion Annually A study

carried out by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland indicates that extreme

weather conditions cost EU transport system at least €15 billion a year.

Currently, the greatest costs incurred are from road accidents, with the

associated material damage and psychological suffering. However, costs arising

from accidents are expected to decrease in volume, though time-related costs

attributable to delays are projected to increase. In part, this is due to

climate change, whose impact on extreme weather phenomena was addressed in the

study, and because of consequent costs. In the study conducted by VTT and EWENT

project partners, researchers calculated the costs, caused by extreme weather

phenomena for the transport system, its users and customers of freight carriers

in the 27 EU member states. This marks the first time calculations have been

completed on this scale and scope. The study shows that the mode of traffic

most vulnerable to extreme weather is road traffic. It continues to have a

higher volume than the other modes, with the additional factor of not being

centralised or professionally controlled, in contrast to rail or aviation. In

particular, the consequences of extreme weather are visible in road traffic in

the form of increased road accidents and the cost arising from them. In other

traffic modes, far more likely than accidents will be time-related costs with a

variety of causes, typically delays. Aviation in particular is prone to

time-related costs in extreme weather. The annual net cost in European aviation

is on the order of billions of euros, borne by travellers and airline

operators. Surprisingly, infrastructure related costs did not have a lion's

share of the total costs. In road traffic, heavy time-related costs are

particularly frequent in freight traffic. At EU level, annual losses, measured

to be around 6 € billions annually, are suffered by the customers of freight

carriers as a result of time-related costs, and here is a risk of continued

growth in costs. This is due to the growth in volumes of freight-carrying

traffic, which is forecast at 1-2 per cent a year. Furthermore, improved

efficiency in production chains accentuates the importance of adherence to

timetables, creating further potential for growth in time-related costs.

Passengers in road traffic will incur time-related costs, as extreme weather

conditions slow down traffic, keeping people away from productive work. At the

same time, however, road accidents will be on the decline in the EU. VTT's

researchers estimate that improvements to vehicle safety, along with the

warming caused by climate change, may reduce the cost arising from road

accidents by as much as half by 2040 -2070. However, the impact of climate

change on extreme weather conditions, along with the cost arising from such

conditions, is hard to estimate with any accuracy. In the North, where most

costs incurred by traffic are attributable to snow and ice, heavy snowfalls may

actually become more frequent, despite climatic warming. In Southern Europe,

one cost factor to be reckoned, but which is studied far too little, with in

the future may be heat waves, leading to decreased pedestrian traffic and

cycling, and to increased motorised traffic. Moreover, as droughts grow in

frequency, so will sand storms and dust storms, and as torrential rains follow

heat waves, soil will become less firm, creating potential for landslides. The

traffic mode least affected by extreme weather is sea traffic. However,

transport by sea is no solution to the problem of the time-related costs,

experienced by European transport traffic, because cost-efficiency continues to

be the factor that dictates the choice of transport mode. Bulk freight is

transported by rail or waterways, with lower average speeds but a better

guarantee against the vagaries of weather. High-priced freight, sensitive to

schedule disruptions, is transported by road and air, which are fast transport

modes but susceptible to the whims of extreme weather. “If at first you don’t

succeed, try, try again. Then quit. No use being a damn fool about it.” –W.C. Fields I thank you Firozali

A.Mulla DBA

 

Firozali A.Mulla
Firozali A.Mulla

It is not clear what changes Google has offered

to make. The four areas the Commission criticized were: how Google favours its

own services in its search results, how it displays content from other

websites, how it manages the ads appearing next to its search results, and how

its actions affect marketers' ability to buy ads on rival networks. If a

settlement isn't reached and the European Commission files a case against

Google, it will set the stage for a lengthy process that could result in the

company being fined up to 10 percent of its annual revenue. In theory that

could mean a fine of as much as $3.8 billion, based on Google's revenue last

year. But in a shift of tactics from previous commissioners, Almunia said in

May he would prefer to end market abuses as soon as possible, rather than fine

misbehavior retroactively, especially in the Internet industry. I thank you Firozali

A.Mulla DBA 

Ivan
Ivan

Who makes such decisions in Google? There must have been some wisdom in developing products like iGoogle (which are used by a vast majority of people) so what is the logic behind shutting such products down...? Google is becoming too fickle minded...it should remember that it is such products that distinguish it from microsoft and others...

SudeepAgarwal
SudeepAgarwal

I used Google Sync for Blackberry. Hate to see it disappear, but then I'm replacing my Blackberry soon too, so it's probably best for Google. 

Taxpyer
Taxpyer

Instead of viewing these things as failures, I prefer to see them as innovation.  True, they didn't see mass adoption, but at least they tried.

People may complain about Vista, but I found it to be a very stable platform. 

Teresa K
Teresa K

What about  things MS bought just to kill off, like the wonderful Lookout Software? And I'm sure many are still trying to forget Bob...

Music66
Music66

Shutting off iGoogle seems shortsighted.  It's our "home page", but I guess I'll be using MSN or Yahoo for a "starting point" in the future.  These guys are thinking way too forward, and forgetting that most folks still prefer using the internet from a desktop, and many (most?) have little (zero?) interest in using Chrome amp; Chrome apps (I'm a Firefox kind of guy).

Firozali A.Mulla
Firozali A.Mulla

It is not clear what changes Google has offered

to make. The four areas the Commission criticized were: how Google favours its

own services in its search results, how it displays content from other

websites, how it manages the ads appearing next to its search results, and how

its actions affect marketers' ability to buy ads on rival networks. If a

settlement isn't reached and the European Commission files a case against

Google, it will set the stage for a lengthy process that could result in the

company being fined up to 10 percent of its annual revenue. In theory that

could mean a fine of as much as $3.8 billion, based on Google's revenue last

year. But in a shift of tactics from previous commissioners, Almunia said in

May he would prefer to end market abuses as soon as possible, rather than fine

misbehavior retroactively, especially in the Internet industry. I thank you Firozali

A.Mulla DBA 

Barbara C. Sutton
Barbara C. Sutton

a goodly percentage of the items in question before they officially became goners...FoxGetPositionWork.blogspot.com

Barbara C. Sutton
Barbara C. Sutton

iGoogle was nice.... hate to see it go, but it was obvious because they never made a Google+ gadget...FoxGetPositionWork.blogspot.com

APai
APai

comparatively microsoft graveyards are legendary - vista, winme, etc.  of all the other large tech companies, microsoft has got to be the single worst of them all! microsoft would not have a graveyard, they would have a mass burial site considering the size of each of those big blunders!

Raymond Chuang
Raymond Chuang

Given all the public howls about shutting down iGoogle, don't be surprised that Google either backs off or announces soon a new "Google Start" page that includes widgets for quick Google Mail and Google+ access.

jkth
jkth

don't forget Windows Live QnA, Windows Live Expo, SQL Server Notification Services, ResponsePoint.

There are more besides, I'm sure...    

Alvin B.
Alvin B.

iGoogle was nice.... hate to see it go, but it was obvious because they never made a Google+ gadget.

APai
APai

 yeah, still has a year more to go though!