Why It’s Unnecessary to Completely Reinvent the iPhone Year After Year

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As I was waiting in line for Apple’s iPhone event last Wednesday, I was talking with a number of my analyst colleagues. We all agreed that no matter what Apple launched, there would be folks in the media writing headlines about why the iPhone was disappointing, what it was missing and being generally negative. At my firm’s publishing site, Tech.pinions, we wrote a range of content trying to add perspective to this discussion. Through the process, we had great conversations from people on all different parts of the consumer-adoption curve.

It’s important to remember that much of this sentiment is held by the tech media and the rather small group (from a macro perspective) of early adopters. But this sentiment arises because Apple has done so much to define the smart-phone category, playing a major role in leading this segment to maturity. To get there, Apple has led the market with quite a bit of innovation in nearly every iPhone release. Now the expectation from the tech media and early adopters is that Apple needs to blow our minds with a world-changing device each and every year. The problem is that this is not necessary for success.

(MORE: Apple’s Secrets Aren’t So Secret Anymore, and That’s O.K.)

The Truth About Mature Markets

The reality is that the smart-phone market is reaching maturity. We currently sell more smart phones worldwide every year than we do traditional desktop and notebook computers. Over half the U.S. population has a smart phone, and we will quickly get to 75% saturation over the next two years. Once a market reaches the point where smart phones are today, history shows us that more evolutionary product iterations are the norm, while revolutionary leaps happen less frequently and are, in fact, more difficult.

The fundamentals of this market accurately reflect a mature growth market. Which means there are still new customers to acquire, and these customers are shopping with predefined preferences. If all of a sudden a leap in innovation occurs, it runs the risk of not being adopted by larger segments. This section of the market is the largest size by volume and appreciates more evolution than revolution because of the less technical nature of its needs and wants.

To use a parallel industry as an example, we do not expect Ford or Kia or Honda to change the world every year with their newest products. In fact, I can think of no industry that releases products on an annual basis where the expectation is radical innovation in every product. Mature markets simply don’t work that way.

Apple wants consumers in the middle part of the adoption curve who appreciate upgrades in key features they find valuable with each new generation. This part of the market wants products that are simple to use and just work. They do not want to have to tinker with or fuss with such products. That’s always been the appeal of the iPhone, which is why its satisfaction ratings are the best in the industry, and it’s exactly what the market will find appealing about the iPhone 5.

New-to-Apple Customers

Now, I am well aware that there are other smart phones on the market with better specs, larger screens and subjectively better features — not all of which have been available on the iPhone. Some features and functions Apple was not first with. That’s all fine and good, but many consumers (over 400 million of them) are not customers of competing platforms, they are customers of Apple. What matters is that Apple keeps its customers happy.

These customers have invested time, money and energy into Apple’s ecosystem and have no desire to leave. Therefore, what is most important to Apple customers is that Apple gives them the key features and functions that matter, are useful and add to the experience Apple wants to deliver to its customers. It doesn’t matter if Apple is first; what matters is that the company offers the features that are relevant when the time is right. A key element of innovation philosophy is that what you leave out is just as important as what you put in.

That is exactly what Apple has done with the iPhone 5. It has brought key new features and functionality to its customer base — a customer base I am convinced has had extreme pent-up demand for this new iPhone. Existing Apple customers will be extremely pleased with the latest-generation iPhone, and I fully expect the iPhone 5 to shatter all previous iPhone sales records. However, upon seeing this amazing new piece of hardware, I also expect Apple to welcome many new members to its customer base.

MORE: Techland’s Complete iPhone 5 Coverage

Ben Bajarin is a principal at Creative Strategies Inc., a technology-industry-analysis and market-intelligence firm in Silicon Valley. He contributes to the “Big Picture” opinion column that appears every week on Techland.

64 comments
szentmiklosy
szentmiklosy

1. Economy is just fine stop listening to the media.

2. The poor need to have the newest and greatest

3. The truly wealthy don't need the newest latest greatest.

4. Samsung is eating away at apples profits

5. Yes apple does need to reinvent and sales show that.

6. We shouldn't be concerned with all these comments

7. Why am I even commenting?

8. This is crazy.

9. What am I doing?

10. I have to get a life

Ward Cleaver
Ward Cleaver

Apple doesn't need to redesign or innovate.  Put an Apple lodo on anything and the fans will buy it and friendly pundits will proclaim it as the greatest thing since Apple invented the mouse. 

http://www.cultofmac.com/95614...

cm6096
cm6096

Its the same reason why someone buys a new BMW this year and then next year sells it for a new Mercedes....  Its about showing wealth off.

nicov784
nicov784

You are correct, they don't need to. The just need to upgrade and put in new key features. You are 100% correct...BUT, if you are going to upgrade here and there, just do it, say it, and sell it. 

Apple is the one who puts out some new features and acts as if they reinvented the phone, again.....and again....and then again.....and will again next year. They are going to be their own worst enemy if they put out this dream product for every launch. They hype up and then deliver more of the same.  Their promo videos for the iPhone 5 seem like Saturday Night Live skits...seriously, are they that dramatic about a 4-inch screen??  "We built the iPhone 5 from the ground-up?" No you didn't! You bought a larger screen from Samsung right after you sued the hell out them!.

You don't see BMW having one hour keynotes and promo videos like they reinvented the car for every new 3-Series do you? No, they just do it, advertise it the way it is and sell them. 

I appreciate Apple in all their glory. But, enough is enough. The smartphone market is now mature. The competitors are keeping, and many beating, Apple in all areas and features of the smartphone. It will not be until another market disruption, like the iPhone was is 2006, that we will see who the next tech leader is and Apple is just another giant in a world of giants. 

-Cheers

mehwoot
mehwoot

"In fact, I can think of no industry that releases products on an annual basis where the expectation is radical innovation in every product. Mature markets simply don’t work that way."

Except um, that's the way the IT industry has worked for 40 years and will continue to work as long a Moore's law continues and technology improves.

Phones were a mature market 15 years ago, but it is still being constantly revolutionised.  With advances in Speech to Text, NFC, wireless technology, processor speed and memory, battery life and capacitive touch, there is a lot of innovation left to come.

Becky Strohl
Becky Strohl

It's a gimmick, that's why.  Everyone is still trying to keep up with the Jones' to prove that they are on top of technology.  Well, thank goodness I'm old and cranky and nobody even bothers me when I actually TALK on my phone ;)

Phil R
Phil R

And here I have heard that the economy is not doing well.  Sort of makes me wonder just who in the economy is not doing well if over 1/2 the population has a smart phone. 

Marc Ellis
Marc Ellis

Why does Adobe tell us we have to always upgrade Acrobat because it's such a sieve of security faults... and then demand we have to upgrade to the next version because they no longer support earlier versions....   CASH FLOW... we have you hooked!

bibleverse1
bibleverse1

They do need to reinvent this phone every year because tech changes every year. Wait fo the iphone 5s.

Alek Gembinski
Alek Gembinski

Ugh, they changed the dock again. Nothing will work with the new iPhone. I went to Microsoft when apple swapped RCA inputs for a headphone jack. I hate how apple does this. I have a mixer that docks people's iPhone if i want to mix in a track -- not with the new 5 :(

vibar
vibar

because the same idiots line up to buy it every time

Matt
Matt

If you're going to post about people being "idiots," you might want to:

a) use correct punctuation, capitalization, and grammar.

b) learn how to use a computer so you don't end up double-posting.

Just my 2¢...

vibar
vibar

 because the same idiots line up to buy it every time

Juan Bimba
Juan Bimba

Why reinvent the Iphone every year? because they are people stupid enough to get a phone that basically does the same than the previous one but think they are way cooler having the latest useless gadget. 

realworldaddict
realworldaddict

MONEY.  What else? Reinventing the iPhone every year brings in the dodos who will pay big bucks to get the newest toy, never mind they're not really getting anything  better, just the newest version of the same old thing.  Sorta like all the 'new' cars that get showcased every year. 

Stan Durbin
Stan Durbin

Apple's success is two-fold, in both marketing and innovative design. While Apple has made no information available on the backwards compatibility of the iPhone 5 (with Lightning to 30-pin adapter) with existing iPhone/iPod accessories, and the Lightning port has apparently dropped support for wired video output, Apple has been able to set new records on preorders of the device. That's a result of great marketing.

It will be interesting to see consumer response after they receive their new iPhone 5 and discover they must spend potentially hundreds more replacing their iDevice accessories or, worse, discover that the fancy media player in their new car isn't compatible.

I look at this as an opportunity for me to reevaluate my fascination with iDevices. If my investment in iDevice accessories is lost due to incompatibility, I have nothing to lose in considering alternate platforms. I realize I'm in the minority though.

The accessory vendors are lining up!

PaperFootball
PaperFootball

"Existing iPhone customers will be extremely pleased with the latest generation iPhone,"

I've had an iPhone since the beginning and I have to say that the charm has finally worn off.  Apple's business model is to tell you what you need, when you need it and how to use it.

I've never shopped for a smartphone before as Apple has always told me what to get, but I must say I am really looking forward to finding out what I want and need.  

I can tell you one thing, whatever phone I choose will have removable SD card, use a USB cable and have a battery that gets me through the day.  Apparently Apple really doesn't know what I want and need after all...  

Fatesrider
Fatesrider

(Disclaimer: I hate Apple.  I loathe their business model.  I despise their designs.  I see them as favoring form over function to the detriment of their users.  I hate, I hate, I hate their software.  My opinion is that their only "genius" is in marketing by telling people off-the-shelf tech is "innovative" and making them believe it.  This is my opinion.  It isn't going to change.  Don't bother trying to.)

Inasmuch as you lay out a mostly reasoned case here, I can't help but see this as an apology for Apple's lack of innovation and playing catch-up with their competitors.  Apple has ALWAYS marketed themselves as being the leaders with the implication being that everyone else is always playing catch-up with Apple.   The iPhone 5 is proof that Apple is not innovative this time around as it has nothing that hasn't been out for a year or two in other phones.

But what really kills me is how despite this lack of innovation and playing catch-up and the lack of features  that are still wanted and the fact that Apple remains generally unresponsive to what its customers want, its marketing machine still manages to make their customers loyal to a brand at a time  and in a market when brand loyalty is probably the single-most fiscally and productively irresponsible thing a person can do.  It tells their customers what they should have and the customers nod in unison.  This kind of top-down approach to customer service is (IMHO) a disservice to their customers (and one of the main reasons I hate Apple).  There is no practical reason to NOT listen to what your customers want and many good business reasons to do it.  Instead, they watch their competitors like a hawk for any innovation they can repackage and market as as their idea, ensure money flows to the hype machine  (AKA Apple Marketing) to keep at leat ten stories stories about Apple in every media market whether it's entertainment, tech, business, sports or what have you (at least so it seems) and generally try to keep their customers wanting "more".

After your article, it's now obvious why they do this.  Shrewd marketing.  They put out a small amount of what their customers want so they'll come back every year and buy a new phone.  It isn't the "perfect phone" (though it's always marketed as such - you can't market an imperfect phone) so each year they put out an incremental improvement counting on a rabid brand loyalty among their fan-base to ensure money flows heavily into their coffers.

Looked at from an objective point of view (which is where I was before I found so many really good reasons to hate Apple and very few good ones to like it), I see a lot of people who are dazzled by marketing shelling out their hard-earned money on a device that doesn't do everything they want it to do because the company tells them it's the best they can get (despite the arguibility of what constitutes "best").

Frankly, it sounds to me much more like a religion than a business.

So in the end, Apple benefits, its customers have to be satisfied with incremental improvements because Apple only does some of what the competition does that's successful all the while telling its customers that it's the best they can get (a glittering generality), keeping them on a leash of their "walled garden experience" and knowing everything about their iPhone users while telling them nothing about themselves. 

The bottom line is that regardless of whether they HAVE to innovate or not, real innovation will ALWAYS sell.  In the meantime, they'll have loyal customers to suck dry while they play catch-up

Given that you apparently respond to every one who posts, I imagine this will be moderated and given my disinclination to jump aboard the Apple band-wagon, I strongly suspect this won't ever be seen by those who aren't Apple cheerleaders.  As long as you read it, I'm fine with it.  I'll just post it on my blog with a link to your article.

(Edit) Well, shut my mouth. It did post. Kudos to you for that.

benbajarin
benbajarin

I don't respond to everyone who posts.  Just those who I feel can engage in a mutually respectful dialogue.   

I appreciate you taking the time to write that comment.    I think the reality is that human beings are emotional beings and often times purchases are driven by this factor.   If you have not read a book called Predictably Irrational, I highly recommend it.   

What lies at the core of my article and this entire discussion is that of consumer loyalty.   I think we are dismissing an inherent trait for many to get attached to their devices.   Let alone I think this statement gets even more true with things we label personal computers like smartphones, tablets, notebooks, etc.   I don't think there is inherently anything wrong with this.   

What can be debated is whether this is blind loyalty, hence your comment about religion.  In this case I don't think it is since I contend that Apple's products are in fact competitive.   When I make that statement I am factoring, design, experience, ecosystem, etc into the feature set.   Features are not just specs.   

But I think at the end of the day what I understand at a cerebral level but really still get stumped with, is some folks desire to feel the need to criticize others for their purchasing choices.  I am not saying you did this, just that when I see the rants from Android lovers against Apple or vice versa I am blown away at the level of insults coming just simply because a consumer choose one device over another.   

I am pro innovation and luckily that can come from anywhere and we should praise and applaud whoever does it regardless of brand or label.   

undeadcow
undeadcow

 well, maybe because most (i mean most - NOT all !!!) people who want an iPhones are total IDIOTS and are going to buy it anyway

Ezekiel Weasley Fuller-Harris
Ezekiel Weasley Fuller-Harris

This disappointment towards the iPhone 5 is Apple's own creation.

The entire culture surrounding Apple's products is that Apple are reinventors. The things they create are better than all others. They are faultless.

Is it then wrong for consumers to expect the new iPhone to live up to this image? Smaller updates on Samsung devices are acceptable because Samsung don't make themselves out to be borderline messiahs.

Carl Roach
Carl Roach

It's hilarious given your comment (which i agree with by the way) that Apple and Samsung are duking it out in court. Everywhere else in the world Apple has lost to Samsung in court, but here in the good ole' USA, a foreign company gets sued for a billion dollars for supposedly copying something that Apple copied from 4-5 other companies....Our patent and trademark office needs to be stripped clean of anyone over the age of 40, and start over. Their rules and regulations have absolutely NO clue what to do with smart phones, computers, electronics, etc. When a company can trademark a square with rounded corners, or a picture of a old phone receiver in a green box, or a color and font in a logo, the patent office has obviously run off the rails.....

Ivan
Ivan

Innovation now belongs to handset makers who use droid versions...Apple is spending too much time and energy in chasing IP violatin cases...these guys need to get their priorities right...

Raymond Chuang
Raymond Chuang

If Apple had included NFC on the iPhone 5, it would have wiped out all its competitors in a blink of an eye.

Given that in eastern Asia (and increasingly Europe) NFC mobile payments are quite ubiquitous, the lack of NFC may hamper iPhone 5 sales. Indeed, one of the reasons why Samsung included NFC on the Samsung Galaxy S II and S III models is the fact that NFC mobile payments are very common on South Korea and Japan.

poet1
poet1

Raymond, I can't speak for Asia; but 'quite ubiquitous' NFC payments in Europe? Do you have access to a parallel Europe?

vasu_phx
vasu_phx

Apple is having much more cash load than any other company. There is no excuse for not developing new innovative software/hardware. They can still continue to selling their old products with few minor enhancements like Siri if they are concerned about their customers leaving them ..

Starshiprarity
Starshiprarity

Of coures they don't have to be innovative at every release. How many android phones are out there just incrementally better than their predecessor? I don't mind that.

What I do mind is rabid excitement over incremental improvements. Apple doesn't have to innovate, but it'd be nice if it could keep up. Still no expandable memory, still no potential for replacing parts yourself, still a  closed hardware and software environment- that operates for no other purpose than to drive funds towards apple.

You don't have to innovate with every generation- but don't pretend to when you're not.

Gary McCray
Gary McCray

I actually think that Apple has managed to pull about as much hype out of the IPhone as it's got to deliver. 

Good job, but after the 5 I think they are fighting an uphill battle to have it viewed as much more than an expected appliance for future releases.

Unless they manage to come up with some really spectacular innovation (brain implant maybe).

If they price the IPad Mini aggressively, Apple will probably capture a major chunk of the 7" market, but then they would be wise to actually try to think up something truly novel and new for their "next big thing."

Stereo eyeglass OLED  based retinal projection personal computers with wireless connectivity might fit their model, like I said, really spectacular.

I. M. Wright
I. M. Wright

The tech-pundits expect Apple to reinvent the iPhone every year because the Android vendors are reinventing their smartphones every few months.  They keep adding a never-ending amount of features to their smartphones so consumers can enjoy feature overload.  Android vendors believe this is the only way to win over customers.  Add more features, get more customers.  Also keep enlarging the display because the larger the display the easier it is for normal-sighted users to read what's on the display.  Android smartphone vendors believe there is no such thing as too large a screen for a smartphone.  They think that a small tablet makes a great smartphone.  The Droid lovers believe that every feature the iPhone doesn't have makes it a far worse smartphone than any Android smartphone. 

The tech-pundits will continue to be disappointed with the iPhone because Android smartphones are larger, faster, have more choices, less-expensive, more expandable and are totally open.  Meanwhile, Apple will just have to settle for selling hundreds of millions of iPhones to consumers that don't concern themselves about being in a spec and feature race.  Major product cycles for Android smartphones are about every nine months to stay ahead of the competition.  A yearly iPhone upgrade just isn't enough to satisfy the tech-pundits.  Things like customer support and ease of use mean nothing to tech pundits because they're smarter than the product planners at Apple and know what's best for consumers.

Raymond Chuang
Raymond Chuang

Actually, the Android phones are pretty settling down to a standardized set of features. And those features are being shaped by the Samsung Galaxy S III, considered by many the state of the art of Android cellphones (and by far the most popular flagship model with over 20 million sold).

IQMinusOne
IQMinusOne

When did Apple completely reinvented iPhone?

It's probably marginally true from 3 to 4. But it looks like this iPhone is already set in stone. They didn't even bother to change the GUI. It's all the same. Oh, to be fair, the wall paper changed.

Parthiv dave
Parthiv dave

Reply to "we do not expect Ford or Kia or Honda to change the world every year with their newest products."

You don't buy car every two year or every year as we buy phones , so what should drive us to buy new phone

Choking Kojak
Choking Kojak

Bravo Sierra...  

And, if I type the word "point" enough, people may start to think I clearly made one where I was paid to! :P

benbajarin
benbajarin

Who is Sierra? 

Choking Kojak
Choking Kojak

What I am reading in your piece?

Choking Kojak
Choking Kojak

Concerning this piece, you've already read it. 

benbajarin
benbajarin

What aren't you reading in my piece? If you have an original insight I would love to hear it. 

kevjohn
kevjohn

Just making sure I have this right... You're praising Apple for NOT being innovative, for fear of scaring off potential new customers? 

benbajarin
benbajarin

I think we have different definitions of what innovation is and more importantly different ideas of innovation for whom. 

gogoboy
gogoboy

Compare to Samsung and few others, Apple at least didn't flood the mkt with new model that contain tiny improve or scale back version every few months. The so call analysts obviously have no clue on what they are doing ad are bunch of sheep's follow the flock ingrown wait inline falling off the cliff.

Daner Doodle
Daner Doodle

I'm sorry, but these writers need to have a dictionary on hand at all times so they can be periodically refreshed as to the definition of the words 'innovation' and 'reinvent'.

Making a gang-busters product in an already existing market is not innovation. Making the handset amp; software too similar to the original version in an attempt to play it safe (or "what you don't put in") is not reinvention.

Jurassic
Jurassic

What were you expecting? A new iPhone with 3D holography ("Help me Obi Wan")?

Just looking at the outside of the iPhone 5 doesn't tell you anything about the many innovations inside it. These include:

- Fastest ARM processor available (Primate Labs tested the dual-core 1.0GHz A6 processor and found it faster than the fastest Android phone or tablet with a quad-core 1.4GHz processor)

- LCD with a unique In-plane multi-touch sensor, giving a much sharper and less reflective display.

- The only mobile LCD that displays the full color gamut

- An 8MP camera that is greatly improved over the iPhone 4S (the iPhone 4S camera was previously judged to give the best photos and videos)

- A carved aluminum unibody

- The thinnest smartphone available (yes, thinner than the ones that claim to be thinnest, but ignore the thick bump where the camera is located).

- Etc., etc., etc.

You can't judge a book by its cover, or an iPhone by its outside appearance.

brenro
brenro

 Geekbench, Antutu, sunspider, cfbench all show the Galaxy S3 soundly spanking the iPhone 5 in speed. Motorola RAZR  XT909 and XT910 and Huawei Ascend P1 are all thinner. Inferior navigation, no micro sd, no removable battery, non HD screen. Unable to access data while talking on the phone on Verizon or Sprint. (bet you didn't know that one). Continue to drink the Koolaid but at least know the facts.

brenro
brenro

I mentioned the phones that are thinner, simple fact.

See the test results for yourself.

Turn by turn navigation with a map stored offline is subjective to you?

A user replaceable battery is subjective?

I agree with your last sentence, and that goes for ANY phone but it irks me to see people give attributes that aren't true.

AdamChew
AdamChew

Funny that you have to mention so many droids to compare to the iPhone.

Speed? How fast is the fast your are talking about.

As for the inferior navigation and the blah, blah, blah - is subjective.

The saddest part is it is just a phone and some people treat it like the holy grail.

conet
conet

Dual core 1GHz processor and 8MP camera? Apple finally caught up to the Droid X2.

supermunkey91
supermunkey91

 In cameras, megapixels don't always mean better. Focal point, aperture width, # of lenses are other points that can set one 8MP camera from another. For instance, if i have say a 10MP camera with three lenses, aperture width of .5mm I'm not going to be able to take a very good picture. Yes, i can take in more physical data, but I'm limited by the amount of light coming in through the aperture and the focus of the lenses. Also, dual/quad cores mean nothing. The 2nd gen Intel i5 2500k is a 3.3 GHz quad core CPU. The new AMD FX8 is a 8 core CPU, but they are both comparable in speed and power consumption. Why you ask? Well, Intel puts hyper threading into the higher end CPUs. Less physical cores, but it almost doubles to a theoretical 8 core. Hope this makes sense.

benbajarin
benbajarin

I would add as well that many confuse innovation with invention in the grand scheme of things as well.   I was looking at this as a response to much of the mainstream media who in many other tech sites were saying the iPHone was boring because Apple didn't blow or minds or change the world again with this product.   My point is that is un-necessary until a market is either stale or saturated or both.   

Thanks for the comment.  I appreciate you taking the time. 

rad4d
rad4d

So, essentially - if Apple innovates, they are leaders.  And if Apple fails to innovate, it's because we don't need or want innovation...

iDontgetit

benbajarin
benbajarin

re-invention or leaps in innovation are best suited when a market is either stale or fully saturated and often times both.    Up until that point its likely to expect evolution over leaps in innovation.   That is my point.  

rad4d
rad4d

 Of course, that's understood, Ben. 

But I don't think anyone was looking for a 'leap' of innovation with the iPhone 5, and nobody expects a complete reinvention of the product.  But, there simply is no innovation in this phone.  It's all catch up with competitors.  I expect more out of Apple, and I'm especially interested if a post-Jobs era Apple is going to be able to amaze me again.  This didn't.  Even the 4s's Siri has turned out to be nothing more than an amusing toy.

And while it's easy to read your article and agree with it - yes, too much change too quickly isn't always the best thing for the die hard consumer (i.e. don't give them a reason to leave) - I can also read this as an article that attempts to mask the fact that Apple truly delivered nothing this time out.

I'm afraid Apple is looking like they're heading into a 'coasting' cycle - playing prevent defense on name alone as opposed to sporting an aggressive offense.  That will work for a while, of course, but by the time they decide to innovate again they may have lost serious ground.  2 years is a long time to sit on your hands in this industry.

I'll still give them another year to wow me, though.

His Shadow
His Shadow

there simply is no innovation in this phone.

I guess we missed all the other metal unibody phones on the market?

Richard G. Khalifé
Richard G. Khalifé

 Totally agree with you. If only Apple could have the monopoly on smartphones, tablets, etc... Wouldn't it be good, since, even if others invent something, the same thing would be better if it had an apple on it.

Andrew Leane
Andrew Leane

I agree with the ecosystem statement. I believe that increasingly ecosystems will define what systems people buy . I have spent time and money finding, buying and been familiar with the apps i want on android. Others out there on the mac store. As time goes on this investment will be harder and harder to transfer (microsoft is hoping it is not too late) all companies need to do is to not upset customers enough that they will feel the need to go though the pain of leaving.

Michael Jardeen
Michael Jardeen

Both features were limited because Apple does not want to kill battery life or require 'Kill Process" apps to control bogging down the phone. You can violate these limits by jail breaking your phone if you want, but for most people they will never notice the difference.

benbajarin
benbajarin

That may be but i'm not sure its the press that Apple will respond to.... it is competition.   

rad4d
rad4d

"So although there are other devices on the market with features I find compelling.  I find them more compelling when they are on Apple's platform than a competitors."

I'm not sure I agree. The problem I always have with iOS is that when they add functionality to keep up, they always do it in a limited manner.  Take multi-tasking and notifications.  Both implemented as limited versions of cornerstone Android functionality.  I'm a loyal Apple user as well, but maybe not to the level you are.

In the end, I respect your point - but I think the press is letting Apple off easy.  And by letting them off easy,  it allows them to coast longer.

benbajarin
benbajarin

I agree that they are indeed playing catch up but here is how I look at that point.   First note that I have been using the Galaxy Nexus with jelly Bean since June.  I also used a Galaxy S3 for a short time in there but I like Jelly Bean way more than what Samsung put on the S3.   

But here is my point.  I have used the iPhone up to that point for 5 years.  I have invested considerable time and energy into the iOS platform.   I also am a loyal Apple customer.  So although there are other devices on the market with features I find compelling.  I find them more compelling when they are on Apple's platform than a competitors.  Now I am in this industry so analyzing gadgets plays a role.   But the middle of the market on the law of diffusion of innovation will tend to feel more comfortable when key features are brought to the devices they are familiar with or have chosen for a specific reason to invest in.    

From that perspective the advancements although not new to the market are new to Apple customers.  Who will appreciate the ability to get an upgraded device with features they desire with out having to leave the ecosystem they invested in.  

I do think there will come a time where we are wowed again but I'm not sure its in the next few years.

Stride888
Stride888

Taking the example of PC's you could argue the market was saturated early last decade. People were still buying PC's and the US market was still growing until the Ipad came along. Also to note - the average PC is used for more than a few years. The average Smartphone on the other hand will be very lucky to survive 3 years due to the abuse it is put through. I have not seen anyone who has a mobile phone older than two years. And Apple now plays for the rapidly growing global market which dwarfs the US.

Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith

I can also read this as an article that attempts to mask the fact that Apple truly delivered nothing this time out. http://Ace16.com