Technologizer

BlackBerry Z10 Review: A Modern BlackBerry Phone with Some Kinks

The first BlackBerry 10 handset gets a once great phonemaker back in the game, but it needs more apps and fewer bugs

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BlackBerry

BlackBerry's new Z10 and Q10 smart phones

Research in Motion, the company behind the BlackBerry smart phone, has made some spectacularly wrongheaded moves in the six years since Apple announced its first iPhone. It said the iPhone wasn’t a game changer and claimed that apps don’t matter. It’s grafted new features like touch input onto its aging operating system in ways that didn’t please anyone. It’s wasted time it didn’t really have to spare on a misbegotten tablet.

But in April 2010, RIM did something deeply sensible: it acquired QNX, the maker of a highly regarded, industrial-strength operating system used for applications such as car electronics and medical devices. It then set out to build all-new BlackBerry phones built on top of QNX’s plumbing — a project so ambitious that it wasn’t the least bit startling that it took years and involved multiple delays.

And now, at long last, that 2010 decision has a shot at paying off.

Last week, RIM began its press event in New York City by announcing news that was simultaneously shocking and logical: it was changing its name to BlackBerry, bringing its corporate branding in line with its much more famous product. Then it unveiled the first two phones running BlackBerry 10, its new QNX-based platform. The BlackBerry Z10 is a full-touch model that goes on sale in some countries this month; it’ll show up in the U.S. on AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon in March. (Only Verizon has announced a price so far: $199 with a two-year contract.) The BlackBerry Q10, which sports the iconic BlackBerry physical QWERTY keyboard, will arrive later this year.

I’ve spent the past few days with a Z10 review unit provided by BlackBerry. The phone isn’t the sort of reality-defying, epoch-shifting landmark BlackBerry would have needed to silence its critics and lure teeming masses of skeptical iPhone and Android fans. It needs more high-profile apps, additional features to set it apart from other smart phones and fewer gnarly bugs.

But you know what? In multiple ways, it’s already better than I expected it to be. Behind the scenes, BlackBerry has been building a mobile operating system that’s fresh, fun and functional. It’s put the software on a handset that’s recognizable both as a current smart phone and as a BlackBerry — just the sort of thing it desperately needed to keep remaining BlackBerry loyalists from defecting.

The Z10 feels modern in part because it’s the first BlackBerry in years that isn’t based on outdated hardware. Its 4.2-in. screen is midsize by 2013 standards; the 1280-by-768 resolution gives it an eyeball-pleasing density of 356 pixels per inch, a skosh better than the iPhone 5. It’s got an 8-megapixel camera on the back and a 2-megapixel one on the front for video calls, a zippy dual-core processor, LTE 4G wireless broadband and 16GB of storage with a MicroSD slot for expansion.

The industrial design, while not exceptional, is nice. The phone is .35-in. thick, but the bedimpled plastic back pops off so you can replace the battery. (Which you may well want to do: after a day of use, I found that the battery gauge was usually dangerously close to empty.)

Modern phones, of course, aren’t defined by their hardware. All that plastic, metal and silicon is just a container for software and services. And while BlackBerry 10 isn’t really the 10th version of the BlackBerry operating system — it won’t run programs written for any previous version — it works hard to update some of the concepts that once made BlackBerrys so successful.

Back in the 1990s, the very first RIM devices weren’t smart phones — they were smart pagers, and their defining application was the first really powerful e-mail service you could put in your pocket. E-mail and other methods of textual communications have remained core to the BlackBerry experience ever since, an emphasis that doesn’t change in BlackBerry 10.

You do much of your communicating in the BlackBerry Hub, an überapp that stitches together e-mail, phone calls, updates from social services such as Facebook and Twitter, text messaging and BlackBerry Messenger, which now does video calls and screen sharing as well as instant messaging. The BlackBerry folks envision the Hub as a timesaver that will reduce the need to bounce around from separate app to separate app; in fact, they don’t even provide a dedicated home button to get you to BlackBerry 10’s home-screen grid of app icons. (You reach it by swiping up and to the right, a gesture that’s easy enough once you remember it.)

The BlackBerry Hub is well done, but the Z10 wouldn’t be nearly so slick a communicator if it weren’t for its on-screen keyboard. It’s the best stock keyboard I’ve ever seen on a touch-screen smart phone — a smart successor to the clicky little physical keys on most BlackBerrys of yore.

As with an iPhone or Android handset, you can tap to type, a process that benefits from such niceties as number keys that sit in a row atop the alphanumeric ones and gestures like the ability to swipe the backspace key to delete an entire word. But the BlackBerry 10 keyboard uses predictive technology to let you type without tapping. As you type, the operating system displays its best guess for the word you’re planning to enter on the spacebar, letting you complete it with one touch. It also wedges other word possibilities in between the letters on the on-screen keyboard. You can select any of them by flicking a word upward — whereupon the software may show its guesses about the next word you intend to type.

I found that mastering all this wasn’t a cakewalk: the word suggestions are displayed in tiny, low-contrast type that’s tough to read, and I’m used to typing as fast as my thumbs can muster, which tends to cover the suggestions. But with a little squinting and adjustment to my habits, the keyboard let me get text into e-mail and other applications at a remarkably speedy clip.

A feature called BlackBerry Balance, also available on the PlayBook tablet, caters to a traditional BlackBerry fan base: corporate IT people. Using BlackBerry’s server software, they can divvy the operating system into two separate-but-equal environments — one for personal stuff and one for work stuff. Each can have its own set of e-mail accounts, apps and other items, and a company can enforce security measures such as preventing an employee from cutting and pasting corporate data into a personal e-mail account.

Beyond all these classically BlackBerryesque touches, the company has packed BlackBerry 10 with other apps. It’s built camera software with a mind-bending feature — somewhat similar to one in some Samsung phones — that lets you snap a group portrait, then move individual faces backward and forward through two seconds’ worth of time until everyone is smiling and has open eyes. There’s a little tool for composing multimedia shows, a note-taker called Remember and a voice-powered assistant akin to Apple’s Siri and Google’s Google Now. The company has also put together decent on-phone storefronts for music, movies, TV shows and magazines.

It’s easy to find spots where these offerings are shallower than their iPhone and Android counterparts — the map app and voice assistant are both minimalist compared with the competition. But there are also plenty of instances of the bundled apps going beyond the basics; the Web browser, for instance, has a streamlined reader review that’s comparable to the one in Apple’s Safari.

And then there are third-party apps and games — an impressive-sounding 70,000 of them at launch, the company says. Plenty of high-profile contenders are already in the BlackBerry World store or on their way: Documents to Go, Dropbox, Facebook, Foursquare, Fruit Ninja, Jetpack Joyride, Kindle, LinkedIn, Rdio, Skype, Twitter, Where’s My Water and others.

Appwise, it’s probably the most impressive haul ever for an operating-system debutante. And yet, there’s no way for a brand-new platform to come anywhere close to rivaling Apple’s iOS or Google’s Android, both of which boast hundreds of thousands of programs. Among the high-profile apps and games that aren’t (yet) on BlackBerry 10: Bejeweled, Flipboard, Hipstagram, Hulu Plus, Instagram, Netflix, Temple Run and YouTube. Evernote is also missing, although BlackBerry’s own Remember app is similar and provides access to Evernote notebooks.

The more I dug around in BlackBerry World, the less giddy I was over the count of 70,000 apps. Some of the lesser known wares I sampled were crude conversions of PlayBook or Android apps that weren’t so hot in the first place. Quantity is fine, but what BlackBerry World needs most of all is quality.

Other than the app situation, the biggest telltale signs that BlackBerry is rushing to play catch-up with iPhone and Android are the bugs and other raw edges that remain. It’s no shocker that they’re there — even Apple’s iOS, the most polished mobile operating system, still gets a tad erratic when it undergoes a major upgrade — but they’re irritating evidence that BlackBerry could have used even more time to wrap up BlackBerry 10.

Some of the glitches I ran into:

  • At one point, almost all the features in the browser — like the ability to share pages — refused to recognize my gestures. (They started paying attention again once I rebooted the phone.)
  • The operating system periodically froze altogether for a few seconds, and back buttons didn’t always function.
  • Remember, the Evernote-like note-taker, is a mess — it referred to calendar items by cryptic monikers like “appointment_19343″ and kept redownloading the same photos from Dropbox every time I opened the app.
  • When I tried to use PayPal to pay for apps and movies, the phone not only wouldn’t accept it but also spit up cryptic error messages that didn’t seem to be designed for consumption by human beings at all.

Major operating systems may get all the attention, but minor ones can matter at least as much. If a thoroughly debugged BlackBerry 10.1 comes along soon, it would make the Z10 much easier to recommend.

Even then, the new, improved BlackBerry could turn out to be a noble failure. It’s not clear that the mobile market has room for a another solidly successful operating system beyond iOS and Android: Palm’s Palm Pre was bursting with promise but never went anywhere, and Microsoft’s Windows Phone is admirable but not yet popular.

So if you still think BlackBerry is toast, that’s your prerogative, and you could be right. We’ll see.

Still, the company that’s releasing the Z10 can no longer be dismissed as an embarrassingly out-of-touch outfit hobbled by an obsolete operating system. It’s not going to trounce the iPhone and Android, but it has a shot at re-establishing itself as a scrappy underdog with a viable platform. Even that would count as a surprise comeback for a company that so many have written off for so long.

41 comments
BlackBarry
BlackBarry

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lifeinCanada
lifeinCanada

I picked up my new Z10 on Thursday...been waiting a LONG time for this....only to find out the ONE feature they dropped from previous models was the ability to sync with OUTLOOK. Are you kidding me? This is a business phone...WHAT WERE THEY THINKING???

Time-less
Time-less

Time Magazine, they used to have such good journalists...

Tino
Tino

I have no doubt that Blackberry will continue to make improvements, but at the moment the Z10 at the price it is doesn't really appeal to me and I would much sooner have a Galaxy S3 for the price

http://versusio.com/en/samsung-galaxy-s3-vs-blackberry-z10

as you can see the spec looks a lot better in comparison.

anomally3278
anomally3278

lets remeber that this is a brand new os,  and it has already beaten  iphone and andriod with one simple swipe gesture,get it, swipe, hahah, i have never seen people so scared , happy , and nadd  about  blaeckberry before, and ive been bb by choice since the , 8330,  my 9930  does things that your beloved  iphone and andriod still cant do,

example, take the challenge,  see if you can create a text group(not email) of 100 people, save it . then text that 100 people a simple pic,

there isn't an app that can help you do that,  note' i know everything about your phones- i've done the research and testing  , you know nothing about blackberry  because of you ignorance and lack of research, if so you would know how great blackberry phones are



mckarthyjohn
mckarthyjohn

I think its a fantastic phone. Hard to believe all the things you can do on it...

vijitc
vijitc

Harry, good review with some kinks :). I would agree with the hardware assessment. It has the necessary features but nothing mind blowing. I do think though, having a standard micro HDMI interface included is brilliant and under appreciated. I will agree with you on the aesthetics as well. 

On the software side I thought you could have spent a little more time on the major strengths that put the Z10  far ahead of its competition, at least from the perspective of a business user like myself who wants to be work productive with his phone. Those features specifically are Hub, flow and peek. You did spend a bit of time on hub, but it came across as matter of fact and did little to point out its real strengths. It would have been nice if you could have explained how different and superior it is that the notification centers offered by iOS and Android for example. The flow which allows a user to move between 8 live apps with the flick of a finger using one hand is very powerful indeed. Same goes for having the ability to peek at incoming messages quickly (again the notification center does not come close to providing this feature). These are all very powerful productivity features not offered on either the Galaxy or the iPhone in any kind of efficient way. 

You do spend a lot of time on its weaknesses though and I can't disagree with most of them. I am a Galaxy S3 user and that is my only phone that I use daily. Yes the Blackberry does not have many apps. Yes I agree Google maps apps would be great to have and something I like on my Galaxy. Yes I would like genuine evernote. I would like more general Google integration too like Google drive. Voice assistant? Well I don't know about siri, but the google voice is horrible and hardly worth using, so if the one on Blackberry is even more minimalist, I couldn't care less. Battery life? You say it runs out after a days use. Well try the Galaxy S3. If I spend lunch browsing around on my Galaxy instead of reading the newspaper, I burn through more than half my battery. It appears the battery life on the Z10 may be better. 

With respect to the glitches that you focused on, there are similar sorts of annoying glitches on the galaxy S3 (running Android version 4.1.1). I do get the occasional hang that requires a reboot. I do get cases where the back button freezes. Sometimes it clears up in time and sometimes I have to reboot. I could be in the middle of taking pictures when the camera app just crashes and I have to restart it. The chrome browser just crashes for no apparent reason and I just restart it.. Adding comments to forums on my galaxy can always be an adventure. Also there is a a really annoying glitch where out of the blue my Swiftkey 3 keyboard app get replaced by the stock keyboard and I have reconfigure Swiftkey to be the default again. So we have these types of things even on a mature OS like Android 4.1.1. Again focusing on those things take away from what differentiates the Z10. 

You did focus on one positive which was the keyboard. I would not consider moving from my Galaxy because of the Keyboard. The stock keyboard on the Galaxy is poor I agree, but Swiftkey 3 is a paid app that makes the keyboard experience just brilliant. From what I have seen on the Z10, they are both on par. 

So back to my point. There are  positive features for me far outweigh the negative.  I am planning to move from the Galaxy because of the Hub, Peek and Flow. Those features make my business user experience brilliant and cover 90% of what I do daily. The blackberry balance feature would attract me if we had stringent IT policies at our workplace, but we don't. In fact we plan to abandon BES completely and use the regular data plan for anyone wanting to use the BB Z10. However  I see the feature as a huge positive for the enterprise and it is a feature that could easily get people back to Blackberry from other platforms. 

For my remaining 10% of activity on my phone that is better handled on the Galaxy? Well here is what I plan to do as a compromise. I will use my cheap Nexus 7 wi-fi only tablet to run the apps that blackberry does not support. I am generally sitting down and not on the move for many of these functions and not in need of having to manage them with one hand. Therefore having the Nexus with me for those occasions is fine. I am talking about things like Netflix, Flipboard, Sonos controller, Skype and even Evernote. These can be managed from my Nexus. My Z10 can be in my pocket in tether mode. That is not ideal but more than an adequate compromise for me so I can get the wonderful hub, flow and peek. 

Since those features alone can convince me to move from my Galaxy S3, it is possible that others may want to as well, at least people in a similar business demographic. Therefore it would have been nice if you focused on those particular features and their benefits more, rather than the glitches that are not show stoppers and ones that will be ironed out. 

By the way another feature for that was a nice to have but not critical is BBM, but still a huge bonus. I can now talk more easily to my young daughters and wife who live and die by BBM. They reluctantly use Whatsapp or standard text messaging with me but they don't like using it and neither do I. I just feel left out. I am now back in :). Well not yet. I get my Z10 in 10 days and looking forward to it very much. 

YogiMan
YogiMan

The review is very critical of the Blackberry 10 phones & OS, however be mindful that the comparisons made would be somewhat unfair if not totally unfair as BB is venturing into new territory where others are already treading. I have no doubt that within the coming months its OS, apps & other features would be improved. Once the company keeps improving on its new phones and OS it will survive in the industry as it already has its niche market & can win over more people!!!!!!

vj8203
vj8203

Do you people remember Windows of yore, they are still fixing bugs even after all these years. Expecting a new OS to be bug free is ridiculous. I'm confident the OS should be okay in a short time. 

winter_hat
winter_hat

Does anyone know anything about this phone? Or they just offer their opinion based upon #1) never using it #2) never researching it #3) half-reading one or two biased reviews?  Ridiculous. This is an incredible OS for so many reasons. It is BRAND NEW so some nuances will need addressed, that's what 10.1 is for.  The basics are nothing short of amazing.  Keyboard, 'Hub' (please don't say android notification center), 'Balance' (NOTHING like it), time shift camera, browser, TRUE multitasking (please don't say live tiles or widgets) etc.  All superior to anything available. And that's with an initial release. Settle down iSheep and fandroids, no matter how many times you say it sucks, the truth is, it doesn't.

winter_hat
winter_hat

Reviews are based upon which phone allegiance the 'unbiased' reviewer has.  Either they are a fanboy, or hold stock, or are beholding to someone who has a stock position. It's impossible to find a balanced review.  Read the actual user reviews of verified purchasers.  They are glowing.

YiehnewTamiru
YiehnewTamiru

I think BBRY know what they are doing with the US launch, any new OS is going to have some bugs. By the time the US release comes around most annoying bugs would be fixed by a 10.1 patch. Smart to have the toughest market to penetrate (USA) a good first impression for early adopters ASAP. Think about it how can a company who sole business is phones not know and understand FCC and Carrier protical 4 approval. 

Denesius
Denesius

The BB map app is rather bare compared to the competition? No comments about how long it takes the map to get a gps fix? No remarks regarding the chunky and bare street level detail, even with a screen that's 'a skosh better than the iPhone 5'? The battery was dangerously close to empty at the end of the day? I assume we're talking 8 hours here?  Gee, I'm glad you can pop off the battery: you'll need to carry around a couple of spares, fully charged, to get thru 24 hours. 

I dumped my BB phone & stock the day I laid eyes on the iphone, and haven't looked back. BB's newest offering is a pound short and about 2 years too late, in an industry where 6 months means a new leap in the level of technological advancement.  RIM needs to have its status changed to DNR, and allowed to die a quiet & natural death.


Read more: http://techland.time.com/2013/02/05/blackberry-z10-review/#ixzz2K2RCPA6M

waterlilies02
waterlilies02

"It’s easy to find spots where these offerings are shallower than their iPhone and Android counterparts — the map app and voice assistant are both minimalist compared to the competition."

Are you serious?? I have an iPhone currently, and I would rather chart my own course, using a pencil, and paper map, than the iPhone maps feature. In addition, it's not hard to read between the lines. It's obvious that you never really gave the Z10 a chance, and would prefer your iPhone or Android over a BlackBerry any day.

calds29
calds29

The author HAS to be kidding, right? BB10 isn't the only OS with the 'predictive' keyboard that guesses your next word and remembers your grammatical habits. 

On Android, SwiftKey has been doing that for ages, and just recently, the stock Samsung keyboards on 4.1.2 phones includes the exact same core as SwiftKey keyboards.

harrymccracken
harrymccracken moderator

@vijitc Good comments. If BlackBerry irons out the bugs, and more high-quality apps show up, a lot of folks are going to be very happy with this phone.

anomally3278
anomally3278

@vijitc I SALUTE YOU SIR, FOR ONCE A GS3 USER THAT KEPT IT REAL AND NON BIAS,I POINT OUT THE SAME BADS THAT THE GS3 HAS, BUT OF COURSE GS3 USERS WILL LIE AND CLAIMS THAT THEIR PHONE HAS NO PROBLEMS, AGREED BLACKBERRY 10 IS A BABY TO THE MARKET AND IS ALREADY A CONTENDER, SO I TELL THEM WHAT DO YOU THINK THIS OS IS GOING TO BE WHEN IT MATURES ...

SO I'M  RIGHT ALONG WITH YOU, I'M BB9930 BY CHOICE AND ANYTHING ELSE WOULD BE UNCIVILIZED,

I'M IN THE U.S.  AND WAITING ON MY BBZ10 PATIENTLY , NO MORE RUSH JOBS

harrymccracken
harrymccracken moderator

@vj8203 I hope so. In recent years, nearly every dark-horse competitor among smartphones and tablets has been pretty darn buggy in its initial incarnation. I'm glad that RIM waited as long as it did rather than rushing a really half-baked product out in 2012.

sandifjm
sandifjm

@winter_hat Why are so many BB users always so defensive? iSheep? Fandroids? Grow up. I'm Canadian and actually have friends that work at RIM (now "Blackberry"). I hope that they are able to get back on their feet with this release because it's been sad to watch this once great company sink into near irrelevance over the past 6 years.  I also own some stock through a mutual fund. 

 But all of Blackberry's problems up until now have been 100% self-inflicted.  I owned a Blackberry Tour (9630) from 2009-2011, and it was, without a doubt, the WORST phone I've ever used. And I've been using mobile phones since 1997.  If there are so many "iSheep" and "Fandroids" out there, it's because Blackberry have done pretty much everything wrong since 2007.

Given their recent problems with service outages, underwhelming handsets, missed deadlines and release dates, organizational chaos and the complete failure to read the direction the market was going in, I would say that any skepticism is warranted.

The reviews that I've read so far have been quite fair, and generally quite positive, so please relax. There's another clown upthread who suggested that anyone that doesn't like this phone is "ignorant".  Everyone seriously needs to calm down.

vijitc
vijitc

@winter_hat You are passionate about this phone. I think it bodes well for a company to have people passionate for  and against the product. I agree with you that there are reviewers and people who comment (not Harry) who seem obsessed with seeing the demise of Blackberry for most likely a myriad of reasons, not just for commerce ones. But passionate discussions I think are still good for a company. It creates a buzz.  The reality though is I don't think the slew of negative reviews or positive reviews will have too much effect on the general consumer. Its only the passionate ones that read them. For the general consumer will be influenced what their friends and colleagues have and word of mouth. In other words can BB get its mojo back? If the product is good, it will speak for itself in time. It will be a slow process and will take 2 to 3 years of solid product with solid upgrades and improvements that will tell the tale. Blackberry is not in debt; they have a solid, intelligent leadership team which is also patient and doesn't panic or overreact; they have a passionate following; they have technically the best platform foundation out there (of course this is open for more passionate debate) and they are lean, hungry and focused which will allow them to manage their cash for some time. In other words they have good people with the right tools and time to execute a plan. Whenever I hear about the importance of initial large volume sales numbers, "is it too late?", "it will be DOA on arrival", "no apps", "goodbye blackberry", "not enough features to have people switch" etc, I don't play too much attention. I find many analyst look too much for short term results and base their analysis on current technical and social paradigms. If they had great vision, they wouldn't be analysts, they would be CEOs. But there are good ones out who can see the forest from the trees and they are lots of good ones out there. 

harrymccracken
harrymccracken moderator

@winter_hat I hope it goes without saying that I don't hold stock or have any vested interest in making BlackBerry look good or bad. And like I said, there are lots of things I like in this phone.

SusanAntony
SusanAntony

@YiehnewTamiru - they knew, but what did you want them to do? Give the phones to the US carriers first so they could get approved on time and delay it for everyone else?

harrymccracken
harrymccracken moderator

@Denesius As I say at the end of my story, you may well be right. I sometimes wonder what would have happened if Lazaridis and Balsillie had bought QNX the day after Steve Jobs announced the iPhone. They should have.

SusanAntony
SusanAntony

@Denesius - They can only do so much with the Tom Tom data that they are using. Remember, Google drives around all of the streets in each country to get the data for the street view feature. Have you ever heard of anyone else doing that?

So don't expect that feature on any other mapping app.

winter_hat
winter_hat

@Denesius wow, you short much of BBRY stock?  It's revolutionary in several ways.  The 'Hub' (don't say notifications are the same) makes this the most brutally efficient communication device in history. The keyboard is light years ahead of iOS and better than EVERY droid, even secondary market ones.  'Balance' will change the way work/play is managed. Amazing. IT depts will LOVE this. The browser?  DESTROYS every browser on every platform in Ring 1/HTML 5 testing. Which is the future of apps.  So many things that they others will copy. And you're talking about MAPS?!?! HAHAHAHHAA

sandifjm
sandifjm

@waterlilies02 What review did you read? It sounded to me, and probably everyone else except Blackberry users with giant chips on their shoulders, that he liked the phone a fair bit.

harrymccracken
harrymccracken moderator

@waterlilies02 Sorry, didn't mean to suggest that Apple's Maps is anywhere near perfect. Google Maps sets the standard in this category.


But believe me, I didn't set out to squawk about the Z10. I'm rooting for BlackBerry to make great products and do well with them -- isn't that a way more interesting story than the company withering away?

Denesius
Denesius

@waterlilies02 You're absolutely right about the current status of the iphone map. But this was a marketing step on the part of Apple, not representative of what's available.  And you can always put google maps back on the iphone.  Try that with the BB. As to 'prefer your iphone or droid over a BB any day'...... are you kidding me?  I got a chance to play with a Z10 prototype for a few minutes, and my answer is: ......are you kidding me?!!

harrymccracken
harrymccracken moderator

@calds29 I'm aware of that, and didn't say that this was the only phone with predictive typing.

anomally3278
anomally3278

@calds29 ok so when you want to delete words , do you just swipe to the left or do you have to hit the delete-x button,  because on the bbz10 you just simply swipe to the left to delete words, it also will switch between languages while typing ,  does swift key do that huh

winter_hat
winter_hat

@calds29 underlying the keyboard is Swiftkey technology.  But, they take it further. Three language prediction SIMULTANEOUSLY.  The prediction is above the key where your finger and eye ACTUALLY are.  NOT inconveniently above the keyboard causing you to pause and look and choose.  Heat mapping your mistakes.  If you consistently hit 'i' instead of 'o' it will subtly adjust the virtual location for that key and all of a sudden you think your fat fingers are more accurate.  And space inference guessing whereyoumeant to put spaces and putting them there.  It's the best keyboard ever, even the haters have to agree when they try it.

winter_hat
winter_hat

@sandifjm @winter_hat I use a generic term for generic nameless phone fanboys, which is appropriate. You tell me to 'grow up'?  You take it personal or something?  You know nothing about me.  I use a Samsung Galaxy S3 and it is the best phone I've ever used.  If anything, I'm a fandroid.  But, I was also a programmer before becoming a neurologist and I've been completely disgusted with these 'tech' reviews and 'tech' sites where the reviewers (not this one specifically) actually LIE about the phone.  I've followed this OS development intimately and it's groundbreaking in several ways.  There's nothing like it and if ANYONE should understand the differences it should be 'tech' reviewers.  There is very little accurate information about the phone because #1) the writers are fanboys (yes, believe it or not completely biased reviews by iSheep or fandroids) #2) own stock or are beholding to someone who owns stock.  These people attempt to misinform and lie in order to improve their position or promote their own phone and it's irritating.  So, yeah, basically...it doesn't matter how many times the fanboys say it, it doesn't matter if they yell it at the top of their lungs, the fact of the matter is the phone does not suck and they can't make it so by constantly repeating it.  The actual purchasers of the phone are speaking with their reviews.

winter_hat
winter_hat

@harrymccracken @winter_hat Sorry, didn't mean to imply you did. Your review actually seems fair. Just been very frustrated with the reviews that show an obvious bias and lack of knowledge of the phone.

sandifjm
sandifjm

@harrymccracken @waterlilies02 OH MY GOD! YOU'RE NOTHING MORE THAN A PAID HACK FOR APPLE AND/OR ANDROID. YOU'RE BIASED, AND WANT BLACKBERRY TO FAIL (despite expressly stating the opposite) said every Blackberry user ever.

waterlilies02
waterlilies02

@harrymccracken I'll give you that, it's way more interesting. Google has set the bar pretty high, and even the almighty Apple can't keep up. I have always liked the underdog, and I'm rooting for Berry to pull out of their slump. I don't want to have to load a 3rd party app, onto a phone that has a map function. I hope it improves over time, and can only hope they are reading these reviews. :)