Technologizer

More Evidence That 3D TV Doesn’t Matter

The BBC's three-year 3D break could go on forever.

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Three weeks ago, ESPN announced that it was shuttering its all-3D sports channel. And now the BBC, which has been experimenting with 3D for programming such as Queen Elizabeth II’s annual speech and Doctor Who, says that it’s going to put it on the back burner for the next three years:

Explaining the problem, Shillinglaw told RadioTimes.com: “I have never seen a very big appetite for 3D television in the UK.

“Watching 3D is quite a hassly experience in the home. You have got to find your glasses before switching on the TV. I think when people watch TV they concentrate in a different way. When people go to the cinema they go and are used to doing one thing – I think that’s one of the reasons that take up of 3D TV has been disappointing.”

At first blush, announcing that you’re going to take a three-year break from 3D sounds like it’s tantamount to giving up altogether. And it probably is, unless new technologies such as Dolby’s glasses-free 3D make the whole idea more palatable than it is today. Even then — with all due respect to Her Majesty — it seems like there’s an awful lot of video content, on the BBC and elsewhere, which simply wouldn’t benefit from an extra dimension.

 

4 comments
Nixter
Nixter

3D TV is a poor example of what can be accomplished in the world of three dimensional imagery. 3D images that have discrete fully separated images for the right and left eyes deliverers a totally stunning deeply immersive experience that has to be seen to be believed. This newest 3D TV fiasco has negatively effected the perceptions of the public as to what 3D can do. The latest movie 3D trend is fading for the same reason, the 3D hardware used have not delivered a solid and visually transparent effect of all of the three dimensions of the spaces around us. The proper hardware needed to deliver this effect properly requires a headset that provides discrete images to each eye. When done this way the effect is visually seductive and very addictive in its appeal and beauty.  Current consumer hardware like the Oculus Rift VR headset will provide a proper experience when it is manufactured with the full 1080 resolution as planned. I think that complaints that the need to wear a headset is inconvenient and ugly, will be superseded by the unbelievable feeling that true, proper 3D delivers when done correctly. Sony and others are working on bringing this next generation of discrete channel 3D headsets to market but high prices are holding back its emergence. In plain language I will say that no matter what you think about this right now, you WILL change your mind when you experience this next gen 3D in person, once it has been seen there will be very few wanting going back to the old and obsolete 2D "flat" technology.

IntangibleGuy
IntangibleGuy

3D TV reminds me much of all sorts of surround sound systems back in the 80s which were thought to oust mundane Stereo systems due to their allegedly immersive sensation.  ha ha ha ... what a zinger

Just because something is technically feasible it doesn't mean it makes any sense at all.

therealdude
therealdude

I believe two things hurt 3d TV. The most obvious being the glasses, which a lot of people don't want to fool with. The second is the fact that many people have already in recent years spent money on a new HDTV and not too many people want to turn around and buy another TV set just a few years later in this economy when the set they've already paid good money for, works fine.

However, the Dolby "glasses-free" idea might take off someday...if it's ever meant to take off at all.

DarylBrunt
DarylBrunt

3D TV was the dumbest idea ever. 50% of people who watch ANY TV watch TV while doing other things. Cooking, reading, playing with lego, using a laptop. Pointless unresearched tech