Oyster Is a Netflix-like Service for Books

For $9.95 a month – less than what you’d pay for the average e-book – you get access to Oyster’s library of over 100,000 titles.

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Oyster
Oyster

My old high school English teacher used to sneer at television and movies. Both are entertaining, of course, but neither quite challenges the imagination quite like a good book. And unlike movies, books have been around for hundreds of years, giving us a look into our own collective past.

Of course, online there are plenty of sites that offer unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows, but similar services for books are few and far between. That’s why I’m excited about Oyster, a new service that bills itself as a Netflix for books.

The numbers behinds Oyster are compelling. For $9.95 a month – less than what you’d pay for the average e-book – you get access to Oyster’s library of over 100,000 titles. The app offers your choice of typography and a social element to help you discover new books and like-minded readers.

Oyster does a good job at maintaining a diverse selection of books. You get classics like Brave New World and Lord of the Rings, of course, but you also get plenty of modern and non-fiction books as well.Wheat BellyFast Food Nation, Al Gore’s Earth in the BalanceWater for ElephantsLife of Pi are all waiting to be read at your convenience.

For now, the service is compatible with iPhone and iPod Touch users only, though we imagine support for Android (read: Kindle) will be forthcoming in due time. To learn more or to request an invite to Oyster, check out the company’s website.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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3 comments
CraigMcClarren
CraigMcClarren

$10/mo to read books you don't own. So it's like a library, but not free. What a great deal.

JackHernandez
JackHernandez

why not just buy a book? They are one time payments of a much cheaper price, They look good on a shelf, they serve as a reminder of the experience you had with them, they smell good and they are physical object you can hold and appreciate. This new way of reading books is something of a failure to me.

Heizzzenberg
Heizzzenberg

@JackHernandez Much cheaper? Clearly you don't read many books.... $15, $20, $30 is not unheard of when looking at new or recently released books. Even some classics....I admit I don't think I'd read enough to take advantage, and I do own some physical copies myself, but it's not a bad idea for those who read often with their tablets on the go...