Study Says We Unlock Our Phones a LOT Each Day

Between grooming, crying, writing fanfic, more grooming, and sleeping, we still make plenty of time to unlock our phones.

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According to a study released by app maker Locket, the average person unlocks his or her phone 110 times each day.

If you’re at the 110 average, that’s exactly 10 times every hour — assuming you and I have the same lifestyle: 11 hours of regular life stuff (work, commuting, writing strongly-worded letters to brands and government officials, checking my phone), one uninterrupted hour of meticulous grooming in the morning, two uninterrupted hours of crying time to let the sadsies out, one uninterrupted hour set aside to write King of Queens fanfic, one uninterrupted hour of meticulous grooming in the evening, and eight hours of sleep sporadically interrupted by night terrors.

As an asterisk, this data comes from an app maker “that pays users in exchange for placing ads on their lockscreens,” reports BuzzFeed, so it could be that people get extra unlocky when there’s money involved. However, BuzzFeed goes on to point out that the actual number might be even higher. Some of the Locket users getting paid to look at those lockscreen ads were waking up their phones around 900 times per day, though.

Here’s more data:

Locket’s users are most active between 5–8 p.m. ET, when over 75% of users are actively swiping. During peak hours the average user checks his or her phone nine times an hour. Even during low frequency hours (3–5 a.m. ET), 24% of Locket users are actively swiping, with the average user checking his or her phone four times an hour.

Locket pulled the numbers from over 150,000 users.

Here’s The Cold, Hard Proof That We Can’t Stop Checking Our Phones [BuzzFeed]

1 comments
firefish
firefish

Interesting stats, though I am guessing that is a savvy, younger bunch with the app on their phone to access that data? We recently did a study with the Internet Advertising Bureau using our FishEye tech (and some other stuff) to look at daily interactions in the UK. You can read a little about it here - http://news.sky.com/story/1155584/web-surfers-hooked-on-using-mobile-devices. I think it would be fascinating to do that study again via firefishUS.