Brave Soul Somehow Connects 27-Year-Old Mac Plus to the Web

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For those of you out there who have been pulling your hair out trying to figure out a way to connect your 27-year-old Mac Plus to the Internet, help is finally here.

Over on Keacher.com, an unnamed hero has documented an epic battle: getting a computer with an 8-megahertz processor, four megabytes of RAM and a 50-megabyte hard drive to surf the modern web.

For those of you youngsters reading this, megahertz came before gigahertz and megabytes came before gigabytes. Computers were slow, fascinating and wonderful all at once before the turn of the century. Now they just work without much thought, for the most part.

Anyway, the tale of this 27-year-old Mac is the tale of soldering, getting a Raspberry Pi to do some heavy lifting, and corrupted Zip disks. The stuff of legend, I tell ye.

Here’s video of the final product sloooowly loading up: The Y Combinator site takes around six minutes, for cracked ice. Unreal.

How I introduced a 27-year-old computer to the web [Keacher.com via Reddit]

5 comments
GregWeaver
GregWeaver

On the upside, he probably won't be picking up any viruses...


AndyO'Donoghue
AndyO'Donoghue

JeffFrank's got me thinking; CompuServe with its user IDs in the format: 70000,2222comp - although we dubbed CompuServe Information Service CI$ given the cost.   And then there was Apple's eWorld - short-lived but a Mac only service run by GE, with an interface that was, sort of graphical. Then, the web arrived - and the bills got smaller, but slowly!

NewRiseDigital
NewRiseDigital

I don't think I'd like to use this for my daily surfing but impressive nonetheless. Jeff if it makes you feel better I remember bulletin boards, acoustic couplers, Sinclair ZX80s, casio watches and Motorola brick phones and (yikes) paying for an email address. What a privilege to be of the age to witness the passing of the industrial age into the technological age. How far we've come.

JeffFrank
JeffFrank

When the Mac came out (circa 1983 and the model above is listed as 1986), 1200bps (bits per second) modems (things that hooked up to analog phone lines) were about the top end of online computing.  CompuServe (R.I.P.) and Delphi and AOL (not dead yet) were all the rage, along with local online BBSes (bulletin board systems), and pretty expensive; you paid by the hour.  The internet, as such, existed to connect universities and the gov't.  If there was a world-wide web, it wasn't known to the average person and wasn't accessible from any of the proprietary systems listed above, which were pretty much text-based, even though AOL had a graphical shell to make it "pretty."


God, I feel old now.