Reviews & Features

An Extra-Strength All-in-One: iMac Spring 2011 Review

Pity the poor iMac. In an ecosystem that boasts iPad 2s, MacBook Airs and iPhone 4s, Apple’s all-in-one desktop stalwart looks like the old stand-by. It’s had a few design changes over the years, going from a plastic enclosure to aluminum and getting that glossy edge-to-edge glass display, but it’s never been quite as sexy as the other …

Broken But Beautiful: ‘Brink’ Review

What happens to society when you run out of resources? That’s the question lurking in the background of new post-apocalyptic first-person shooter Brink. On a massive floating city known as the Ark, two extremes of troubling human behavior come to the fore in view of the game’s theme: perpetual conflict. The Security faction wants to lock …

25 Essential Apps for Travelers

After a long, cold, dark, snowy, jerky winter, we’ve officially hit some nice weather. And not the fake nice weather where it’s nice for half the day and then it rains and then the next day it snows—fool me once, shame on you; fool me pretty much all of April, shame on me for breaking out my short-shorts and donating all my warm …

Meet the 20-Year Old CEO Redefining Mobile Advertising

The first thing you notice about Kiip CEO Brian Wong is how decidedly un-CEO he actually looks.

Case in point: I made two swervy surveillance laps around a not-at-all-crowded, lower-level concourse in 30 Rock before I spotted the 20 year old Digg alum alone at a table, scrunched over his iPhone. In nerdy black glasses and a halfway …

Five Easter iPhone Apps That Are Actually Pretty Cool

Yep, Martha Stewart spiked our Easter-app fever with her Egg Dyeing 101. But the iTunes store was a fertile ground of arty holiday-themed apps, and we found some other pretty cool contenders. Whether you’re a devout egghead, an occasional Peeps-ter — or prefer to celebrate your own Easter-time holiday of “West”er — these five …

Hide Your Hard Drive’s Secrets in Plain Sight

Encrypting data on your hard drive can be such nuisance, what with all the special apps and public/private keys, and the whole thing might as well be a pound of slag if you forget the passcode.

What if you could just hide everything in plain sight?

Turns out you can. It’s called steganography, from the Greek steganos, …

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